Sunday, July 13, 2014

Great Job Everyone!

Great job everyone.  It was an honor to be your teacher for Art Appreciation.  Please keep in touch and let me know how you are from time to time.


Thursday, July 3, 2014

Final Exam, Tuesday, July 8th

Icarus, plate VIII from the illustrated book, "Jazz" Henri Matisse, 1947,  Pochoir, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York















Note:  No class on Monday, July 7th

10 minute presentations on your collage self portrait using Henri Matisse's Icarus as an inspirational starting point. Please be prepared to provide a coherent, concise and thought provoking analysis of your piece.

The Final Exam:

Art Piece: _______________________________________________
Artist:  _______________________________________________

1. Discussed Elements of Art Yes Limited No  25 points
Line, Shape, Form, Volume, Mass, Texture, Value, Space, Color, Time and Motion
Justification for choices? Yes Limited No

2. Discussed Principles of Art Yes Limited No  25 points 
Contrast, Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, Proportion, Emphasis, Focal Point, Pattern, Rhythm
Justification for choices? Yes Limited No

3. Discussed the Media and Technique used Yes Limited No  25 points
Drawing: Pencils, Silverpoint, Charcoal, Chalk, Pastel, Crayon, Ink, Quill & Pen, Brush
Painting: Encaustic, Tempera, Fresco, Oil, Acrylic, Watercolor, Ink, Spray Point
Printmaking: Relief, Woodblock, Intaglio, Engraving, Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Mezzotint,  Lithography, Screenprint, Monotypes & Monoprints
Visual Communication: Graphic Design, Illustration, Layout, Web Design
Photography: Cyanotype, Portraiture, Landscape, Still Life, Photojournalism, Photocollage/Montage
Film/Video & Digital Art: Moving Images, BW, Sound & Color, Animation & Special Effects, Film Genres, Experimental, Video, Interactive Media
Alternative Media & Processes: Performance, Conceptual, Installations, Mixed Media
Craft: Ceramics, Glass, Metal works, Fiber, Wood
Sculpture: Freestanding, Reliefs, Carving, Modeling, Casting, Earthworks, Construction, Light & Kinetic
Architecture: Context, Materials, Importance
Justification for choices? Yes Limited No

4. Performed a comprehensive modes of analysis Yes Limited No  25 points
Content analysis, Iconographic analysis, Biographical analysis, Feminist analysis, Contextual analysis


Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Reading Responsibilities for Thurs, July 3rd

Thurs, July 3rd:  pages 508-589


Yves Klein, Anthropometries de l'epoque,
March 9, 1960, pure pigment and synthetic resin on paper,
mounted on canvas, Private Collection
Katey - Reclining Nudes
Jessica - Performance Art: The Body Becomes Artwork
Keondra - Human Bodies as Installations
Collene - The Body in Pieces
Jacqualein - The Blue Nude: Cutouts and the Essence of Form
Kaylee -  Gendered Roles
Nicole - The Image of Motherhood
Lakisha - The Artist and Her Identity
Kaityln - Feminist Critique
Rachel - Professional Artist and Painter of Women
Aaron -  Making a Self Portrait




Sandro Botticilli, The Birth of Venus,
c. 1482-6. Tempera on Canvas,
Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy

Continue with The Monuments Men

A Rembrandt self-portrait recovered at a German salt mine
that had been used as a storehouse,
with Harry L. Ettlinger, right.
Credit Image by Monuments Men Foundation













We will take a look at this video for today's class: http://www.monumentsmenfoundation.org/for-educators

From the Harvard Magazine:  http://harvardmagazine.com/2010/01/monuments-men-rescuing-art-stolen-by-nazis

Not all Monuments Men were men: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/02/arts/design/not-all-monuments-men-were-men.html?_r=0

Ardelia Ripley Hall returning a portrait of St. Catherine by Rubens to Germany in 1952. CreditImage by Smith College

Monday, June 30, 2014

Art Terms for the Final Exam on Tues, July 8th

The Sorrows of the King, Henri Matisse,
1952, Gouache on paper on canvas,
Pompidou Centre, Paris
(His final self portrait)
Remember to include art terms into the 10 minute final presentation of your Icarus.

The visual vocabulary or the ten (10) elements of art listed in your book include:
Line, Shape, Form, Volume, Mass, Texture, Value, Space, Color, Time and Motion
Portrait of L.N. Delekorskaya,
Henri Matisse, 1947,
oil on canvas,
Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia

The 10 principles of art or the rules of art grammar listed in your book include:
Contrast, Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, Proportion, Emphasis, Focal Point, Pattern, Rhythm

No, you do not have to talk about each and every term.  You do need to talk about the terms that pertain to your final art work.  Include how you decided upon your elements and how you problem solved toward the final work.

Blue Nude , Henri Matisse, 1952,
Gouache painted paper cut-outs on paper on canvas,
Foundation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel



Thursday, June 26, 2014

Readings and Responsibilities

Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts
History and Context, Part 4

Monday, June 30th: pages 454-481
Art and Community - Cook
Spirituality and Art - Cook

Tues, July 1st: pages 482-507

Movie:  The Monuments Men
February, 2014. 118 minutes.

The Monuments Men were a group of men and women from thirteen nations, most of whom volunteered for service in the newly created Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section, or MFAA. Most had expertise as museum directors, curators, art scholars and educators, artists, architects, and archivists. Their job description was simple: to save as much of the culture of Europe as they could during combat.
These men not only had the vision to understand the grave threat to the greatest cultural and artistic achievements of civilization, but then joined the front lines to do something about it.

The real story of the monuments men: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/true-story-monuments-men-180949569/?no-ist



Thurs, July 3rd:  pages 508-589
Katey - Reclining Nudes
Jessica - Performance Art: The Body Becomes Artwork
Keondra - Human Bodies as Installations
Collene - The Body in Pieces
Jacqualein - The Blue Nude: Cutouts and the Essence of Form
Kaylee -  Gendered Roles
Nicole - The Image of Motherhood
Lakisha - The Artist and Her Identity
Kaityln - Feminist Critique
Rachel - Professional Artist and Painter of Women
Aaron -  Making a Self Portrait

No Class on Monday, July 7th

Tuesday, July 8th:  Final, Presentation of your Icarus

10 minute well thought out presentation of your Icarus

Title: _______________________________________________

1. Discussed Elements of Art? Yes No 25 points
Line, Shape, Form, Volume, Mass, Texture, Value, Space, Color, Time and Motion

2. Discussed Principles of Art? Yes No 25 points
Contrast, Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, Proportion, Emphasis, Focal Point, Pattern, Rhythm

3. Discussed the Media and Technique used?  Yes No 25 points

4. Performed a comprehensive modes of analysis? Yes No 25 points
Content analysis, Iconographic analysis Biographical analysis, Feminist analysis, Contextual analysis

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Thursday, June 26th

Giorgio De Chirico,
The Melancholy and Mystery of the Street,
1914, Oil on canvas. Private collection
Assignments for Thursday, June 26th:

Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts
History and Context, Part 3
  • Art Nouveau, Jacqualein
  • Expressionism, Nicole
  • Dada, Lakisha
  • Surrealism, Katelyn
  • Abstraction, Rachel
  • Abstract Expressionism, Aaron
Please don't forget that your Mid-term re-do on question #4 is due today.  Since this is a written assignment, remember to spell and grammar check.

Wed, June 25th

Trenton Doyle Hancock, artist, Paris native

Talking with Trenton Doyle Hancock


Art Appreciation class,
Face-to-Face conversation
with artist, Trenton Doyle Hancock

Artwork by Trenton Doyle Hancock

Artwork by Trenton Doyle Hancock
Much appreciation to Trenton Doyle Hancock for spending time with the Upward Bound students enrolled in the Art Appreciation Summer I class at Paris Junior College.  Trenton generously offered his time Tuesday afternoon answering questions about art and specifically, his art.  Since he is from Paris, attended Paris Junior College and is a hometown hero, it was a real treat for the students to be able to talk to him and have him answer their questions. Thank you Trenton.

Assignments for Wednesday, June 25th:

Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts
History and Context, Part 3

Wednesday, June 25th, pages 375-414 
Responsibilities:
  • Renaissance, Kaylee
  • Baroque, Nicole
  • Rococo, Katelyn
  • Neoclassicism, Rachel
  • Romanticism, Aaron
  • Realism, Katey
  • Impressionism, Jessica

Monday, June 23, 2014

Tuesday, June 24th

Bidgusattva Oadnaoabumi,
Cave 1, Ajanta, India.
Cave painting,
second half of 5th century
Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts
History and Context, Part 3

Tuesday, June 24th, pages 335-374

  • Indian Art
  • Art of Japan
  • Art of the Americas
  • Pacific Island Art











By Thursday, June 26th, please email me at gsisco@yahoo.com or provide a written answer to question #4 on the mid-term test:

Write a comprehensive analysis using modes of art analysis detailed on pages 154-163 of the art piece you presented in class for the mid-term. Value: 25 points on mid-term test.

Modes of Analysis
Consider whether one or more of the following ways of analyzing an artwork can be applied to the subject of your art piece:

Content: Does the work clearly depict objects or people as we would recognize them in the world around us (is it representational)? Alternatively, is its subject matter completely unrecognizable (is it non-objective)? To what degree has the artist simplified, emphasized, or distorted aspects of forms in the work (or abstracted it)?

Iconographic analysis: Are there things in the work that you can interpret as signs or symbols? For example, is there anything that suggests a religious meaning, or indicates the social status of somebody depicted in the work? Labels often provide good information about iconography.

Biographical analysis: Would information about the life of the artist help you to interpret the work? Again, labels are often a good source of biographical detail. In some museums volunteer docents are available to answer questions about an artist’s life and works.

Feminist analysis: Is the role of women in the artwork important? Is the artist commenting on the experience of women in society? Is the artist a woman?

Contextual analysis: Would you understand the work better if you knew something about the history of the era in which it was created, or about religious, political, economic, and social issues that influenced its creation?

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Reading for June 23-26

Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts
History and Context, Part 3

Reading for the week of June 23-26

Please note, you need to be able to talk about the images in your content area.  You do not need to know the images posted on Friday.

Monday, June 23rd, pages 294-334

  • Prehistoric & Ancient Mediterranean, Katey
  • Ancient Greece, Jessica
  • Roman, Keondra
  • Byzantine, Collene
  • Gothic, Jacqualein

Tuesday, June 24th, pages 335-374

  • Indian Art, Cook
  • Art of Japan, Cook
  • Art of the Americas, Cook
  • African Art, Cook
  • Pacific Island Art, Cook

Wednesday, June 25th, pages 375-414

  • Renaissance, Kaylee
  • Baroque, Nicole
  • Rococo, Katelyn
  • Neoclassicism, Rachel
  • Romanticism, Aaron
  • Realism, Katey
  • Impressionism, Jessica

Thursday, June 26th, pages 415-451

  • Art Nouveau, Jacqualein
  • Expressionism, Nicole
  • Dada, Lakisha
  • Surrealism, Katelyn
  • Abstraction, Rachel
  • Abstract Expressionism, Aaron

Extra Credit

  • Pop Art
  • Minimalism
  • Conceptual Art
  • Postmodernism


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Assignment for June 23-27

Please read and be ready to talk about the art history era and images of that era assigned to you.  There will be no tests at the beginning of class next week.  Your daily grade will be based on how prepared you are for your portion of the art images and the period in art history that is your topic area assigned. You are not responsible for the images posted on Friday.

History and Context, Part 3 Assignments

Katey: Ancient History, Realism

Jessica: Classical Greece, Impressionism

Keondra:  Classical Roman, Post-Impressionism

Collene: Byzantine, Symbolism

Jacqualein: Gothic, Art Nouveau

Kaylee:  Renaissance, Cubism

Nicole: Baroque, Expressionism

Lakisha: Mannerism, Dada

Katelyn: Rococo, Surrealism

Rachel: Neoclassicism, Abstraction

Aaron: Romanticism, Abstract Expressionism

Extra Credit:

Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, Postmodernism

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Mid-term on Thursday

Early American Art Gallery - Ray Trotter
The mid-term, Thursday, June 19th, will be based on your ability to incorporate your understanding of the formal/visual analysis of works of art into a presentation of a piece of art of your choosing. Your presentation should be 7-10 minutes long.  Using the Analysis worksheet and readings from the textbook present a piece of art and discuss the elements, the design principles, the media and technique chosen by the artist.  If known, tell about the artist, and the value of the work of art. Your grade will be determined by the depth, clarity and breadth of your analysis.

FORMAL/VISUAL ANALYSIS OF WORKS OF ART
Graffiti in Downtown Paris
A work of art is the product of the dynamic interrelationships between the various art elements and principles as they are utilized by the artist. As you engage with an artwork, ask yourself why the artist made such choices. By considering the elements and principles involved, you can make yourself look more closely at the work of art, and thus understand more fully the artist’s intended vision, as well as noticing how the work reflects the time and place from whence it came.

Elements of Art
Pati Dye and Collage
Line: Do you see any outlines that define objects, shapes, or forms? Are lines used to emphasize a direction (vertical, horizontal, diagonal)? Describe the important lines: are they straight or curved, short or long, thick or thin? How do you think the artist utilized line to focus attention on certain objects, forms, or people? Are any invisible lines implied? For example, is a hand pointing, is the path of a figure’s gaze creating a psychological line, or is linear perspective used? Do the lines themselves have an expressive quality, as in Van Gogh’s Starry Night?

Light: If the work is a two-dimensional object, is a source of light depicted or implied? Is the light source natural or artificial? Do the shadows created by the light appear true to life, or has the artist distorted them? In what way does he or she depict such shadows—through line, or color? If the object shown is three-dimensional, how does it interact with the light in its setting? How do gradations of shadows and highlights create form or depth, emphasis or order in the composition?

Color: Which colors are predominantly used in this depiction? If the object is black and white, or shades of
Matthew Freeman, Lecture on Painting
gray, did the artist choose to do this because of the media he or she was working in, or do such shades create a certain mood or effect? Color can best be described by its hue, tone, and intensity (the hue is its basic shade, for example blue or red). Does the artist’s choice of color create a certain mood? Does he or she make use of complementary colors—red/green, violet/yellow, blue/orange—or analogous ones (those next to each other on the color wheel)? Does the artist utilize colors that are "warm" or "cool"? In which parts of the work? Is atmospheric perspective—in which cool colors recede, creating a blurred background, and warm, clear colors fill the foreground—used?

Texture: What is the actual texture on the surface of the object? Is it rough or smooth? What is the implied texture? Are patterns created through the use of texture?

Shape: What shapes do you see? If the work has a flat surface, are the shapes shown on it two-dimensional, or are they made to appear (illusionistically) three-dimensional or volumetric? If the work is a three-dimensional object, how volumetric is its shape? Is it nearly flat, or does it have substantial mass? Is the shape organic (seemingly from nature) or geometric? In representations of people, how does shape lend character to a figure? Are these figures proud or timid, strong or weak, beautiful or grotesque?

Space: How does the form created by shape and line fill the space of the composition? Is there negative, or empty, space without objects in it? If the artwork is three-dimensional, how does it fill our space? Is it our size, or does it dwarf us? If the piece is two-dimensional, is the space flat, or does it visually project into ours? How does the artist create depth in the image (by means of layering figures/objects, linear perspective, atmospheric perspective, foreshortening of figures)?

Principles­ of Art
Artists utilize the elements of art to produce these design principles.
Emphasis: The emphasis of a work refers to a focal point in the image or object. What is your eye drawn to? Does the artist create tension or intrigue us by creating more than one area of interest? Or is the work of art afocal ― that is, the viewer cannot find a particular place to rest the eye? Is there a psychological focus created through the elements of art?

Scale and Proportion: What is the size of all the forms and how do they relate proportionally to one another? Did the artist create objects larger in scale in order to emphasize them? Or was scale used to create depth? Are objects located in the foreground, middle ground, or background? Look at the scale of the artwork itself. Is it larger or smaller than you expected?

Balance: Balance is produced by the visual weight of shapes and forms within a composition. Balance can be symmetrical—in which each side of an artwork is the same—or asymmetrical. Radial balance is when the elements appear to radiate from a central point. How are opposites—light/shadow, straight/curved lines, complementary colors—used?

Rhythm: Rhythm is created by repetition. What repeated elements do you see? Does the repetition create a subtle pattern, a decorative ornamentation? Or does it create an intensity, a tension? Does the rhythm unify the work, or does it, on the contrary, seem a group of disparate parts?

Unity/Variety: Is the artwork unified or cohesive? How does the artist use the elements to achieve this? Or is there diversity in the use of elements that creates variety? How does the artwork combine aspects of unity and variety?

Media and Technique
Is the object two- or three-dimensional? What limitations, if any, might the chosen medium create for the artist?

Painting: How did the type of paint affect the strokes the artist could make? Was it fresco, oil, tempera, or watercolor? Was it a fast-drying paint that allowed little time to make changes? What kind of textures and lines was the artist able to create with this medium? Does it lend a shiny or flat look? How durable was the medium? Does the work look the same today as when the artist painted it?

Drawing: Consider the materials utilized: metal point, chalk, charcoal, graphite, crayon, pastel, ink, and wash. Is the artist able to make controlled strokes with this medium? Would the tool create a thick or thin, defined or blurred line? Was the drawing intended to be a work of art in itself, or is it a study for another work, a peek into the artist’s creative process?

Printmaking: What is the process the artist undertook to create this work? Did he or she need to carve or etch? Did the medium require a steady hand? Strength, or patience?

Sculpture: Is the sculpture high or low relief, or can we see it in the round? What challenges did the material present to the artist? Was the work created through a subtractive process (beginning with a large mass of the medium and taking away from it to create form), or an additive one? What tools did the artist use to create the form? If the form is human, is it life-size?

Architecture: Does the building represent the work of a community or the power of a leader? How was it constructed? What was the structure’s intended use? How does it fit with its surroundings? Is it domineering or welcoming?

Modes of Analysis
Consider whether any of the following ways of analyzing an artwork can be applied to the subject of your assignment:

Content: Does the work clearly depict objects or people as we would recognize them in the world around us (is it representational)? Alternatively, is its subject matter completely unrecognizable (is it non-objective)? To what degree has the artist simplified, emphasized, or distorted aspects of forms in the work (or abstracted it)?

Iconographic analysis: Are there things in the work that you can interpret as signs or symbols? For example, is there anything that suggests a religious meaning, or indicates the social status of somebody depicted in the work? Labels often provide good information about iconography.

Biographical analysis: Would information about the life of the artist help you to interpret the work? Again, labels are often a good source of biographical detail. In some museums volunteer docents are available to answer questions about an artist’s life and works.

Feminist analysis: Is the role of women in the artwork important? Is the artist commenting on the experience of women in society? Is the artist a woman?

Contextual analysis: Would you understand the work better if you knew something about the history of the era in which it was created, or about religious, political, economic, and social issues that influenced its creation?

The test:

Art Piece: _______________________________________________
Artist: _______________________________________________

1. Discussed Elements of Art Yes No 25 points
Line, Shape, Form, Volume, Mass, Texture, Value, Space, Color, Time and Motion

2. Discussed Principles of Art Yes No 25 points
Contrast, Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, Proportion, Emphasis, Focal Point, Pattern, Rhythm

3. Discussed the Media and Technique used by the artist Yes No 25 points
Drawing: Pencils, Silverpoint, Charcoal, Chalk, Pastel, Crayon, Ink, Quill & Pen, Brush
Painting: Encaustic, Tempera, Fresco, Oil, Acrylic, Watercolor, Ink, Spray Point
Printmaking: Relief, Woodblock, Intaglio, Engraving, Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Mezzotint,            Lithography, Screenprint, Monotypes & Monoprints
Visual Communication: Graphic Design, Illustration, Layout, Web Design
Photography: Cyanotype, Portraiture, Landscape, Still Life, Photojournalism, Photocollage/Montage
Film/Video & Digital Art: Moving Images, BW, Sound & Color, Animation & Special Effects, Film Genres, Experimental, Video, Interactive Media
Alternative Media & Processes: Performance, Conceptual, Installations
Craft: Ceramics, Glass, Metal works, Fiber, Wood
Sculpture: Freestanding, Reliefs, Carving, Modeling, Casting, Earthworks, Construction, Light & Kinetic
Architecture: Context, Materials, Importance

4. Performed a comprehensive modes of analysis Yes No 25 points
Content analysis, Iconographic analysis Biographical analysis, Feminist analysis, Contextual analysis

PJC Art Appreciation Class Summer I 2014

Meeting at the Fountain this morning

Graffiti in downtown Paris in the style of Banksy
Wednesday, June 18, 2014.

Today is Art Gallery day!  We will be visiting both art galleries in downtown Paris this morning.  Discussion will include public art, graffiti and 1920's architecture.

Hopefully you have read to page 291 in the Gateways to Art text book.


Monday, June 16, 2014

Artist and Painter Matthew Freeman joining us to talk about Art

Please read pages 166-191 in Gateways To Art for Tuesday, June 17, 2014.

Artist and painter, Matthew Freeman will talk to us about art and specifically his art on Tuesday.  I think you will find him interesting and inspiring.

Collaborative work.  Acrylic painting by Matthew Freeman and photograph by Ginger Cook. Spring 2014

On Wednesday, June 18th, we will go to two art galleries in downtown Paris. By Wednesday, please have read to page 291.

Here is the list of terms you will need to be familiar with by Wednesday:
q Drawing: Dry Media: Pencils, Silverpoint, Charcoal, Chalk, Pastel, Crayon , Wet Media:  Ink, Quill & Pen, Brush
q Painting: Encaustic, Tempera, Fresco, Oil, Acrylic, Watercolor, Ink, Spray Point
q Printmaking: Relief, Woodblock, Intaglio, Engraving, Drypoint, Etching, Aquatint, Mezzotint,   Lithography, Screenprint, Monotypes & Monoprints                                        
q Visual Communication: Graphic Design, Illustration, Layout, Web Design
q Photography: Cyanotype, Portraiture, Landscape, Still Life, Photojournalism,  Photocollage/Montage
q Film/Video & Digital Art: Moving Images, BW, Sound & Color, Animation & Special    Effects, Film Genres, Experimental, Video, Interactive Media
q Alternative Media & Processes: Performance, Conceptual, Installations
q Craft: Ceramics, Glass, Metal works, Fiber, Wood
q Sculpture: Freestanding, Reliefs, Carving, Modeling, Casting, Earthworks, Construction, Light &             Kinetic
q Architecture: Context, Materials, Importance

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Collage on Monday with Pati Dye

Man Ray, Collage, c. 1928
On Monday, June 16th at 10:20 am we welcome you to the photography studio of David and Ginger Cook.  Our studio, Paris Texas Photo is located at 10 First Street NE in downtown Paris, Texas.  Here is a link to Google Maps for the location:  https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zc0MTB0d_Uds.kpIwugz1oEVQ.  The phone number if you get lost is 903.783.1132

Artist and adjunct professor from Texas A&M Commerce, Pati Dye, will be talking to us about collage. Please bring all the elements of your design that you have gathered to date.  After Pati's discussion on collage we will brainstorm about each one of your ideas and design elements for your final project.  We will not be actually working on and putting the piece together.  This is a brainstorming, composition and problem solving session.

Your reading assignment for Tuesday, June 17th is to read pages 164 to 227 in Gateways to Art.

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Assignment for Thursday, June 11, 2014

Your assignment for Thursday, June 11, 2014 is to read pages 152-165.

Looking ahead to Mid-Term, Thursday, 19 June 2014:

Please choose a piece of art to visually analyze in class. 

Let me know by Thursday, June12th what you intend to present.  
I want to make sure there are no duplicate objects.  Please use the visual analysis as a guide for a 7-10 minute talk on June 19th about your choice of an art piece.

Looking ahead to the Final on Tuesday, 8 July 2014:

Please have your silhouette and background decided upon by Monday, June 16th.  You will coming to our studio to work with artist and adjunct professor, Pati Dye. Bring materials to discuss your ideas on the collage with Pati and I. The only hard fast rule is that the project must include your silhouette.  You will need to have a firm idea on what you will use as your background and items you intend to collage on your work.

Brooklyn Museum: Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: Feminist Art Base: Kara Walker

Thinking about collage, please take a moment to look at the work of Kara Walker.

Kara Walker (born November 26, 1969) is a contemporary African-American artist who explores racegendersexuality, violence and identity in her work. She is best known for her room-size tableaux of black cut-paper silhouettes. Walker lives in New York and is on the faculty of the MFA program at Columbia University.
Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kara_Walker

Kara Walker Untitled 2001-2005.
Collage on paper 9 works: 8 parts 40,6 x 28,6 cm each 1 part 27,9 x 22,9 cm 48,5 x 36,5 cm, framed.
Other collage artists and schools of thought you might want to take at look at and get inspiration from their work include:



Hannah Hoch, Kurt Schwitters, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Hamilton
Man Ray, Dada Art, Derek Gores, Eileen Agar, Joseph Cornell
Surrealism, John Stezaker, Jesse Treece, Annegret Soltau

Hannah Höch, Für ein Fest gemacht
(Made for a Party) 1936 Whitechapel Gallery

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Assignment for Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Suzanne Valadon, The Blue Room, 1923. Oil on Canvas
Your assignment for Wednesday, June 11, 2014 is to read to pages 151 and be ready to discuss the major content areas.

Vocabulary words to note for tomorrow:
Emphasis, Subordination, Abstract
Negative Space, Pattern, Rhythm
Randomness, Rhythm, Composition,
Foreground, Middle Ground, Back Ground




Suzanne Valadon: French painter, model, 1865-1938
"French painter and printmaker. Born in Bessines, Haute-Vienne, Valadon came to Paris as a baby with her seamstress mother. Early on she learned dressmaking, worked as a circus acrobat, and had a son, Maurice Utrillo. Her first contact with art came through modeling for Renoir and Toulouse-Lautrec. Without formal art training, she began to draw and when Toulouse-Lautrec showed these drawings to Degas, he was sufficiently impressed to arrange a professional exhibition. The many shows and sales which followed brought Valadon financial security, especially after 1924 when the dealer Bernheim-Jeune showed her work regularly. Between 1927 and 1932 she had four major retrospectives and took part in the Salons of Modern Women Artists 1933–8. As an ‘independent’, untouched by avant-garde modernism, her conventional landscapes, still lifes, and flower paintings nevertheless included symbolic, personal references, especially in the 1920s and 1930s. Similarly, though she frequently painted the figure, she avoided conventional voyeurism."

Schubert, Gudrun. "Valadon, Suzanne." In The Oxford Companion to Western Art, 2012

Format

Oil paint, Canvas, 35 3/8 x 45 5/8 inches (90 x 116 cm)

Relation

Post-Impressionist

Description

This self-portrait of Valadon displays the artist lounging on a daybed covered in blue and white floral sheets. She is wearing striped lounge pants and a pink camisole. Her hands are at her sides, and a cigarette dangles from her mouth. She is voluptuous, peaches and cream, and feminine. At her bare feet lay two books. She is gazing off to the right, avoiding the viewer, as if caught in reverie.

Type

Still Image

Citation

Valadon, Suzanne, “The Blue Room (Self-Portrait by Suzanne Valadon),” Élan Vital, accessed June 10, 2014, http://elanvital.omeka.net/items/show/17.

Monday, June 9, 2014

Assignment for Tuesday, June 10

Your assignment for Tuesday, June 10, 2014 is to read pages 106-117 and be ready to discuss the major content areas.  We are going to go deeper into the study of color on Tuesday.  If you have not already read pages 92-105 you might want to make that happen.

Please be ready to identify the following works of art for the test at the beginning of class.

Spider, c. 500 BCE-500 CE, Narca, Peru
Miriam Schapiro, Baby Blocks, 1983, Collage on paper
M. C. Escher, Sky & Water I, 1938, Woodcut
Great Sphinx of Giza, c 2650 BCE. Giza, Egypt
Robert Helmick & Stuart Schechter, Ghostwriter, 1994. Mobile
Rachel Whiteread, House, 1993. Concrete.
Meret Oppenheim, Object, 1936. Fur covered cup, saucer, spoon
Caravaggio, The Calling of St. Matthew, c. 1599-1600
Katsushika Hokusai, The Great Wave off Shore at Kanagawa, 1826-1833, woodcut 
Asher Brown Durand, Kindred Spirits, 1849. Oil on Canvas
Mark Tansey, Picasso and Braque, 1992.  Oil on canvas
Workshop of the Master of Osservanza, The Meeting of St. Anthony and St. Paul, c. 1430-35. Tempera on panel
Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Mistos (Match Cover), 1992, Sculpture
Pieter Bruegel, the Elder, Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, c. 1555-8. Oil on canvas
Edward Weston, Artichoke Halved, 1930. Silver gelatin print

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Assignment for Monday, June 9

van Gogh, Vincent.  "Starry Night," oil on canvas, 1889 
(Museum of Modern Art, New York City).
Great class on Thursday.  If you were unable to attend class please pay special attention to pages 44 and 45 in your textbook, Gateways to Art, Understanding the Visual Arts.

These two pages layout the important framework of learning the visual language of art.  The terms listed are the foundation of this class.

By the end of this class you will need to define the ten elements of art and identify the elements in a work of art.  The ten elements of art are: Color, Form, Line, Mass, Shape, Texture, Time and Motion, Value and Volume.

The ten principles of art are: Balance, Contrast, Emphasis, Focal Point, Pattern, Proportion, Rhythm, Scale, Unity and Variety.

Your assignment for Monday, June 9, 2014 is to read pages 75-105 and be ready to discuss the major content areas.